• DDB’s Benjamin Reyes stated that according to survey, kids as young as 10 years old already involved in drug usage
  • Children aged six-year-old already oriented with the use of rugby as stated by Dangerous Drugs Board (DDB)
  • By the end of the year, the DDB expects one million drug dependents to turn themselves in given the Duterte administration’s no-nonsense campaign versus illegal drugs

At the age of 10, a child was already reported to be user of shabu, and a six-year-old is reportedly already oriented with the use of rugby as stated by Dangerous Drugs Board (DDB) Assistant Secretary Benjamin Reyes on a Senate hearing on Tuesday.

Shabu, the most common choice of drug by Filipinos, is an addictive meth stimulant while rugby is a thick chemical adhesive sniffed by users.

With the government’s intensified campaign against illegal drugs, the DDB expects one million drug dependents to surrender before the end of the year. However, only a percent undergo “in-patient” rehabilitation and the rest of the two to 10 percent are outpatients.

Reyes stated that according to survey, a person can be involved with the usage of illegal drugs as early as 10. This statement was an answer to Sen. Sherwin Gatchalian’s question regarding the age of a person being hooked on illegal drugs.

The child, Reyes said, acquired the supply of shabu from a friend and had “pot sessions inside the house of a friend”; adding that he thought it all came from a drug pusher but it turned out that it came from a friend.

He also told the committee that based on the data gathered by the board, a six-year-old is already oriented with the use of rugby.

“How come? Did the parents give the rugby to suppress hunger?” Committee Chairman Senator Loren Legarda asked.

DDB Assistant Secretary Reyes reportedly answered that it is the assumption and that most rugby users are living in the streets.

He also said that for the government to rehabilitate all of the drug dependents who surrendered, it would cost the government an expense of P4 billion.

“Community-based interventions are given to persons with mild substance use disorders. Ito ‘yung mga gumamit, user pa lang, nag-e-experiment. So, we can still provide community based interventions at the community level,” he said.