• Maurizio Cattelan, a 55-year-old Italian artist, created a fully functional golden toilet for the Guggenheim museum in New York
  • Cattelan named his work “America” and replaced the traditional porcelain lavatory in a single unisex lavatory
  • The Italian artist says his interactive exhibit is about “ultimately reminding us of the inescapable physical realities of our shared humanity”

NEW YORK, USA – A museum in New York are inviting the public to try an 18-carat gold toilet.

Joshua Barrie mentioned in his article for the Mirror Co UK said that Maurizio Cattelan, a 55-year-old Italian artist, created the fully functional golden toilet for the Guggenheim museum in New York.

Cattelan named his work “America” and replaced the traditional porcelain lavatory in a single unisex lavatory. The Italian artist says his interactive exhibit is about “ultimately reminding us of the inescapable physical realities of our shared humanity”.

The Guggenheim Museum said that the piece is about “making available to the public an extravagant luxury product seemingly intended for the one percent” adding that the golden toilet is “a bold, irreverent work.”

Museum visitors are allowed to use the golden toilet after paying the standard museum admission fee.

“Its participatory nature, in which viewers are invited to make use of the fixture individually and privately, allows for an experience of unprecedented intimacy with a work of art,” the Guggenheim Museum said.

Cattelan, who is a truck driver’s son from Milan, hints that his work is inspired by economic inequality.

The toilet fitting, which was done last Monday, was supervised by Michael Zall, the associate director of operations at the Guggenheim.

Zall engaged the services of a “very professional” plumber, who he said was excited by the prospect of fitting a solid gold toilet.

“When he was here he kind of turned into a little kid, and he said he actually had butterflies,” Zall said as quoted by Adam Gabbatt in his article for The Guardian.

“We wanted to try to get it here and get it in as quick as possible so that we had some time to troubleshoot and make sure everything is just right,” Zall said.