• A Portuguese man spent 43 years in a wheelchair due to wrong diagnosis
  • Identified as Rufino Borrega, the man was diagnosed with wrong ailment when he was 13 years old
  • In 2010, he was re-diagnosed with a disease known as myasthenia which weakens the muscles that can simply be cured by taking asthma medication

Mistakenly diagnosed by a Lisbon hospital as having incurable muscular dystrophy, a Portuguese man spent 43 years in a wheelchair.

Identified as Rufino Borrego, the man was diagnosed with wrong ailment when he was 13 years old and started walking without the wheelchair in his fifties, an article published on GMA News Online mentioned.

For four decades, Borrego suffered from the agony of using the wheelchair to get around until a neurologist realized in 2010 that he in fact suffered from a different disease known as myasthenia which weakens the muscles.

Based on report, the rare disease can simply be cured by taking asthma medication.

Medical fact sheet stated that myasthenia gravis is a chronic autoimmune neuromuscular disease characterized by varying degrees of weakness of the skeletal (voluntary) muscles of the body.

The name myasthenia gravis, which is Latin and Greek in origin, literally means “grave muscle weakness.” With current therapies, however, most cases of myasthenia gravis are not as “grave” as the name implies. Most individuals with myasthenia gravis have a normal life expectancy, the fact sheet noted.

With the case of Borrega,  he was able to walk for the first time to his usual neighborhood cafe a year after his new diagnosis.

“We thought it was a miracle,” Manuel Melao, owner of the cafe in Alandroal located in southeast Portugal was quoted saying.

Borrego, who is now aged 61, is able to live a normal life which required only two physiotherapy sessions a year.

When asked if he has ill-feelings against the hospital that made the wrong diagnosis, Borrego said he will rather make use of his life the positive way than deal with negative feelings.

Myasthenia was almost unknown in the medical profession in the 1960s.