• As supported by dictator Kim Jong-un himself, North Korean media outlets were given the permission to promote dog meat as a ‘stamina food’
  • Humane Society International/UK warned about the danger of dog meat consumption saying that, there is no truth to the statement that eating dog meat is healthy
  • Around 25 million dogs are reportedly consumed around the world annually

With famine being a critical issue at North Korea, the country’s media outlets were given the permission to promote dog meat as a ‘stamina food’ as supported by dictator Kim Jong-un himself, suggesting it has more vitamins than chicken, beef, pork or duck.

Based on a report from the country’s Korea Times, Kim Jong-un himself has been recommending the consumption of dog meat in the recent months, describing dog meat dishes as “stamina-boosting” while giving off “health benefits.”

Due to its alleged medical benefits, cooked dog meat, locally known as “dangogi”, or sweet meat in Korean, is highly recommended to the starving North Korean masses. It is allegedly known to have good benefits in the stomach and intestines.

Among the most commonly eaten breeds are spaniels, labradors and retrievers. To make the pet meat even tastier, mongrels should be killed harshly— including beating, flaying and scorching, a report said.

But in contrast to the assumption of dog meat as being “health beneficial”, Wendy Higgins, of Humane Society International/UK, meanwhile, warned about the danger of dog meat consumption.

“There is no truth to the statement that eating dog meat is healthy, this is a complete fallacy,” she was quoted as saying in the report. “In fact, far from being a ‘superfood,’ there is evidence spanning decades of the significant human health risk posed by slaughtering and eating dogs, with warnings issued by the World Health Organisation of links between the practice and outbreaks of rabies and cholera in other countries,” the health advocate added.

The word hunger was also banned in North Korea; following the orders of regime leaders to the mass to use such terms as the ‘Arduous March’ to make their suffering feel like a patriotic pilgrimage.

Though dog meat consumption is still considered illegal in Western and other cultures, it is still part of the daily dishes of various Asian countries like China, South Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Switzerland, remote parts of Europe, the Americas and the African continent. However, some parts of Asia still bans the slaughter and consumption of dog food, including Singapore, Taiwan, Hong Kong and the Philippines.

Around 25 million dogs are reportedly consumed around the world annually, a 2014 estimate said.