• Millenials filed a petition to prohibit burial of the late president Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani
  • The petitioners are Zaira Baniaga, John Arvin Buenaagua, Joanne Lim and Juan Antonio Magalang
  • The University of the Philippines students  were accompanied by their counsel, Atty. Jesus Falcis III

As millenials are being blamed most of the time for the return of the Marcoses into power, four young people filed a petition for certiorari and prohibition before the Supreme Court Monday to prohibit the burial of former president Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (LNMB).

University of the Philippines (UP) students Zaira Baniaga, John Arvin Buenaagua, Joanne Lim and Juan Antonio Magalang — who were accompanied by their counsel, Atty. Jesus Falcis III — asked the High Court “to declare the Memorandum issued by the Secretary of the Department National Defense last August 7 and the interment of the deposed dictator at the LNMB as ultra vires for being without legal basis and unconstitutional.”

According to the petitioners, the Republic Act 289 stipulates that the power and authority to allow Marcos Sr. to be buried can only emanate from the Board of National Pantheon, of which Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana is not included. They claim that that Secretary Lorenzana may have abused his authority and must be ordered by the Supreme Court to cease from implementing his own memorandum.

The millenials also pointed out that the deposed dictator is disqualified from being buried at the Heroes’ Cemetery because he falls under the category of those “dishonorably separated or discharged from the service.”

They added that the LNMB burial for Marcos would place him in the same category as other presidents who are already buried in the LNMB who were not ousted from office or found to be guilty of atrocities and ill-gotten wealth.

“We cannot with a clear conscience accept that Marcos the tyrant lie beside the nation’s genuine freedom fighters. Malacanang cannot insist its will when laws have been enacted recognizing the human rights violations during the Marcos regime. The government must be consistent,” Baniaga stated.

The petitioners claimed that to allow Marcos, who they called an internationally recognized tyrant and plunderer, to lie beside certified heroes shall create that irreconcilable repugnancy with the declaration of State policy under R.A. No. 10368 or the Human Rights Victims Reparation and Recognition Act of 2013.