• A latest development in Earth science to identify particularly the Earth’s past climate has been released
  • The ancient ice was pulled up from the depths of Antarctica and Greenland
  • It is believed that the record dates 800,000 years back

An ice pulled up from the depths of Antarctica and Greenland which was sliced up, photographed and tested unveiled a latest development in Earth science to identify particularly the Earth’s past climate.

The ancient ice now under the study of the National Ice Core Laboratory in Lakewood is a remnant of centuries of snowfall which was compressed by the weight of successive years of accumulation.

Most parts of the ice, however, were shipped to other laboratories where researchers do more experiments in search for clues about the Earth’s past and future.

The ice cores described as smooth and milky white, about 4-5 inches in diameter provide researchers with historical information which include: air temperature, greenhouse gases and evidences of cosmic events.

It is believed that the record dates 800,000 years back.

The ice cores are kept at about negative 11 degrees Fahrenheit in a white-walled walk-room in the Lakewood freezer.

Workers push the cores through a series of saws on metal frame benches, divvying the ice to a prearranged pattern for different experiments.

Crews then secure them in protective tubes, place them in chilled containers and have them transported to Colarado lab via US refrigerated trucks.

Other parts of ice cores were also placed in a larger room at about negative 33 degrees Fahrenheit for future researchers to verify old results.

“You can drill into it, and its much like looking at tree rings,” T.J. Fudge, a University of Washington researcher, said.

Electric current supplied to the ice cores has detected a thin layer of volcanic residue deposited on the ice when a volcano erupted about 8,000 years ago.

Specialized drilling rigs pull the cores as deep as 9,800 feet below the surface of the ice sheets.

Scientists say that a layer of a volcanic residue which indicates the year when an ice was formed is a reference point for annual layers above and below.

The record, scientist say, is remarkably precise which even reflect seasonal changes.

A new technique called continuous flow analysis allows scientists to slowly melt a one-yard stick of ice and analyze it drop by drop, instead of the usual way of cutting the ice into small pieces, melting those one by one to average results.