• Malacañang vowed to address the “increased hunger” in the country via new agriculture programs
  • New agriculture chief’s program is patterned after a feeding program that will directly aid starving Filipinos across the country
  • SWS poll says the total hunger rate has increased to 13.1 percent in the first quarter of 2016 from 11.7 percent in the last quarter of 2015

Malacañang vowed to address the “increased hunger” in the country by instituting new agriculture programs specifically a feeding program that will address hunger nationwide.

This was revealed by presidential spokesperson Ernesto “Ernie” Abella in a press briefing further explaining that Agriculture Secretary Manny Piñol has a program which symbolically begins to address the fact that a lot of Filipino people are hungry, an article which was written by Trisha Macas on GMA News Online stated.

Based on a Social Weather Stations (SWS) poll, the total hunger rate has increased to 13.1 percent in the first quarter of 2016 from 11.7 percent in the last quarter of 2015.

As such, Abella said the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) and “the clusters” of Duterte’s Cabinet are also joining hands to help address the problem.

Meanwhile, Piñol revealed that Duterte wanted him to address food security, especially after the country had just experienced the hottest El Niño the past year and now bracing for the effects of the La Niña phenomenon.

On his first night as the 16th President of the Philippines, Duterte led the hosting of a “solidarity dinner” with poor families at the Delpan Sports Complex in Tondo, Manila and distributed food packs.

Duterte in his speech, shared his anti-poverty plans such as providing education and health benefits for all.

An executive order (EO), the very first to be issued, creating an anti-poverty cluster composed of 12 agencies supervised by Secretary to the Cabinet Leoncio “Jun” Evasco was also issued by the new president.

Under the EO, Evasco was given power over 12 agencies to evaluate existing poverty reduction programs and formulate more responsive ones.

With the supervision of Evasco, the 12 agencies “shall primarily evaluate existing poverty reduction programs and if deemed necessary formulate a more responsive set of programs, complementing the existing ones channeling resources as necessary to reduce both the incidence and magnitude of poverty”.